Smithsonian X 3D – Education



The group that does 3D
digitization for the Smithsonian actually met with educators from all over the institution
and they were really interested in what I would call
teachable objects objects that told compelling
stories, objects that could be
more accessible if they were reduced or
increased in scale, objects that could teach
lessons that the public really
wanted to learn. ♪ ♪ In the museum where I work less
than one percent of our collections items are on
display for people to come and
see in exhibits, but we have
another way of making the
collections accessible and that's via the Internet.
And now we'll be able to share 3D data that could be printed
somewhere else. The 3D printing aspect is a
major motivational tool for teens. They're very interested in
being able to print real objects from a set of
data. Whether they are people who we
have read about who are now
deceased, or if they are historical
figures who we have never met, there's something about being
able to come in contact with
something that they've held, touched, used, that makes
us feel that we are a part of their existence. If students are using data sets
to create their own prints, they're obviously
taking on the science and technology end
of it. I think that there are a number
of ways that it'll enhance classroom
learning. The 3D viewer I think is going
to be one of those great things in the
classroom. One of the things that we work
hard to teach students about history is that it's always
been told from multiple
perspectives and so the "Tour" tool will
allow us to look at an object in a bunch of different ways. On the 3D viewer there will be
what we're calling "hotspots"
and they're pin points to different pieces
of the object. What it does is it enables them to self
guide. What really excites me for the
future is that we'd like to
have the tool be available as an
authoring tool for students and
teachers so that students could be
creating their own tours,
making their own discoveries and pretty much work right
along side us at the Smithsonian and do their own authentic
work. Teachers want access to the 3D
data because they want to help their
students master the
mathematical and technological skills necessary for working
with 3D because they know that today's fifth graders in
ten years are going to go into
a world where 3D data is gonna be part
of their everyday life. As our classrooms move to
multidisciplinary curriculum and lessons, this is
just one more way that they can
bring all of the aspects of
teaching together. Teachers are really yearning to
instruct in a more integrated fashion and these
kinds of projects with 3D printing get students so
excited and motivated. I actually think it will
revolutionize the way in which
we teach. We feel that this technology
allows everyone to be as inventive as they want to be
and then they have the ability to share what they have learned
with others in a very easy and
simple way. I'm really excited to get
feedback and to stay in
communication with our teacher and student community
to find out what exciting
creations they're going to make with what
we have. We believe that solving the
great problems of the world is
in the hands of every single person and that
the more they have access to the tools, the better we all
will be for their having learned how to
use them and how to share them.

One thought on “Smithsonian X 3D – Education

  1. …"We believe that solving the great problems of the world is in the hands of  every single person and that the more they have access to the tools, the better we all will be for their having learned how to use them and how to share them." What an important sentence! Mystic Max Heindel said that "ignorance is sin and the only sin, and applied knowledge is salvation, and the only salvation". Well these are some very important modern tools for saving mankind from devastation. 

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