Jane Austen Practising: Teenage Writings



Virginia Woolf describes the teenage writings as Jane Austen practicing I think because Woolf herself and we of course mainly as readers will come to the teenage writings after we've read a couple of the major adult fiction usually of course it's Pride and Prejudice and Ella but in fact they're very good places to start to begin to understand what's going on in the teenage writings they're not designed for publication there was no expectation in Austen's lifetime or indeed for some time thereafter that they would be published which is not to say that they are private writings they were shared among a circle of family and friends and they were designed for performance enjoyment by that group a boisterous group that consisted in large part of other young people which perhaps accounts for some of the subject matter the flirtation the drink all the jokes about disrespecting your elders for running away from home for stealing all of the kind of criminal motifs that run through the work and indeed the over lack of respect for authority of other kinds like for instance other published texts schoolroom texts history conduct books books that tell girls and boys how to behave these are writings that delight in taking all of that kind of advice and junking it there are two ways you can go as a teenage writer you can write confidentially sort of secret things into your private diary kind of Adrian Mole sort of approach to writing or you can show off and she goes the second way she's a great show-off she wants to show off what she's read what she knows simply how clever she is in family performance one way of thinking about Virginia Woolf comment on these texts was Jane Austen practicing might be in terms of her thinking about or rehearsing for the roles an author and her sense of what an author might be and do and indeed get away with these three volumes look like printed texts or at least they're impersonating the form of printed text following the first volume the second bullying the third as you see the published novels will eventually appear in that fall but also the name although character of the author is a very prominent one in these texts in the dedications the elaborate formal operators that she gives these stories and indeed the idea of the author or the historian in the case of her speaks history of England as someone who is partial prejudiced and ignorant someone who can tease the reader and mock the reader get away with things and trick you and might not necessarily be a consistent or reliable or trustworthy figure at all we know that the whole family loved novels of every kind and she's taking it all and she's exploring it she's pulling it apart critically she's making fun of it she's imitating it she was a great mimic I think a mimic with her pen she's interested in observing liberated girls actually liberated girls going wild

3 thoughts on “Jane Austen Practising: Teenage Writings

  1. All of Jane Austen's so called teenage writings were written by her cousin Eliza de Feuillide while she was living at the home of Jane Austen's parents. All the dates shown on these so called teenage writings can be checked against family letters and records to show Eliza de Feuillide was present at Jane Austen's house on every single date.

  2. The novels of Jane Austen were actually written by her cousin Eliza de Feuillide as I show in my book "Jane Austen – a New Revelation". She could not publish under her own name because she was The illegitimate daughter of Warren Hastings, the Governor General of India. These so called teenage writings were written by Eliza while she was staying wiith her mother at Jane Austen's home.

  3. The novels of Jane Austen were actually written by her cousin Eliza de Feuillide as I show in my book "Jane Austen – a New Revelation". She could not publish under her own name because she was the illegitimate daughter of Warren Hastings, the Governor General of India. The so called teenage writings of Jane Austen were written at a time when Eliza was living at the home of Jane Austen's family. She lived there with her mother for long periods while Jane Austen's mother was having her many children, to help her out. These so called teenage writings were far too sophisticated to have been written by Jane Austen who at that time had had only 2 years primary school education.

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