Fred Judges a Book by Its Cover: The Lost Girls of Paris by Pam Jenoff


-Fred, congratulations. Your wonderful comedy special
was nominated for a Grammy. You were at
the Grammys last night. You did not win, but that is
amazing to be a Grammy nominee. Congratulations.
-Yeah, I had a great time. So thanks.
-That’s fantastic. What a sad clap
from the rest of the band. -I know.
-The weirdest golf clap. You guys call yourselves
rock ‘n’ rollers. But one of the things
I was remarking on you is — you’re always so busy. Not only did you do
a comedy album, but then you have to obviously
go out to L.A. for the Grammys. You’re constantly
traveling around, working on different shows. And one of the things you
were lamenting is — you no longer have time
to read fiction. And you love fiction. -I love fiction so much,
’cause it’s — You know, a lot of it
is, like, pretend. -Yeah, yeah, yeah. -So it’s not always real,
which is good because your imagination
goes into what fiction is. -Yeah. I’ve never heard it
crystallized so well. -Yeah. -But you were saying
that you actually — And I was really
blown away by this. You’ve developed
a process wherein you can basically figure out
everything a book is about — all the plot twists,
all the characters — just by looking at
the cover of the book. -Easily.
-Wow. That must be such a time-saver.
-It really is. It makes flights go quicker.
-So let’s try it once again. You guys, it’s time for
our new segment, “Fred Judges a Book
by its Cover.” ♪♪
[ Cheers and applause ] All right, so, here you go.
You ready, Fred? Just look at the cover and tell me everything
you can about this book. It is “The Lost Girls of Paris”
by Pam Jenoff. Fred, what is this book about? -Well, first of all, isn’t she
who wrote “The Orphan’s Tale?” -Yeah.
-So, “The Orphan’s Tale” — -I mean, I think you just
read that right there. -No, I’m just saying. So, “The Orphan’s Tale” — this
is, like, the sequel to that. And “The Orphan’s Tale,”
as we — I don’t know if
you guys read it. It looks like
what happened was — there was a kid
who didn’t have parents. -Uh-huh. -So then the town was, like —
-Your classic orphan. -Oh, classic orphan. But the town decided —
they were like, “You know, we’re going to
call you an orphan, just so you know. That’s what you are.”
“Great.” And, so, this transformed
into, as we see, “The Lost Girls of Paris.” And what it is — it was a
blueprint for an airport, right? So this airport
was going to be built. But the architect
got the wrong blueprints and, instead,
did a tower of London, right? So in the first three chapters, he’s building
the tower of London. -So, wait. He thinks he’s
building an airport. -Well, the thing
with architects that a lot people don’t know is —
they just do their job. They’re like,
“Show me the blueprint. My job is to complete this. You said ‘airport.’
Not my business.” So, he builds this
tower of London, where — -It’s not “the” tower of London?
It’s “a”? -It’s a tower of London.
-Okay, okay. -And he builds it,
and, of course, now they say that it’s going be
Boston Logan Airport. And, so… -Of cour– So, they’re trying —
Now this is a reveal. This is the twist. The whole time, we think they’re
building Boston Logan Airport, and it’s a tower of London. -Yes. So, then, of course, people go
there to, like, you know, greet people at the airport. And this woman — her name is
Lost Girl, from Paris. She goes there,
and, of course, as you see, the plane’s behind her. The pilots are like, “Uh,
where are we supposed to land?” -And then what did she do? -That’s the sort of
mystery ending of the book. It’s like,
“Where are we supposed to land?” -So it ends at the first time
a plane tries to land… -Yes. -…at what it thinks
is going to be an airport, but it’s a tower of London. -Yes.
So they’re just all at a loss. And there’s, like, a whole bunch
of traffic of planes. -What’s the last line? Because I imagine it must be,
like, incredibly gripping as a plane is coming in
to try to land on a tower. -“Anyone feel
like going to Hawaii?” -Give it up for
Fred Armisen, everybody!

33 thoughts on “Fred Judges a Book by Its Cover: The Lost Girls of Paris by Pam Jenoff

  1. $1,000,000 to ANYONE who LIKES this COMMENT by no later than 12:00 midnight EST on Valentine's Day 2019!!!!!! 🙂

  2. poroshok on the face ??
    i was sitting on the bench with shawn closed ice nd poroshok fell on my faith
    was it pesticide or poroshenko ?
    also my hand dispersed as hologram fades

  3. Having to go out to LA must take so much time out of his day, if only there was something you could do while you were on the plane.

  4. Hey guys, here's what it says on Amazon since Seth left that out:
    "One morning while passing through Grand Central Terminal on her way to work, Grace Healey finds an abandoned suitcase tucked beneath a bench. Unable to resist her own curiosity, Grace opens the suitcase, where she discovers a dozen photographs—each of a different woman. In a moment of impulse, Grace takes the photographs and quickly leaves the station.

    Grace soon learns that the suitcase belonged to a woman named Eleanor Trigg, leader of a network of female secret agents who were deployed out of London during the war. Twelve of these women were sent to Occupied Europe as couriers and radio operators to aid the resistance, but they never returned home, their fates a mystery. Setting out to learn the truth behind the women in the photographs, Grace finds herself drawn to a young mother turned agent named Marie, whose daring mission overseas reveals a remarkable story of friendship, valor and betrayal.

    Vividly rendered and inspired by true events, New York Times bestselling author Pam Jenoff shines a light on the incredible heroics of the brave women of the war and weaves a mesmerizing tale of courage, sisterhood and the great strength of women to survive in the hardest of circumstances."

  5. Back of Book:

    1946, Manhattan

    One morning while passing through Grand Central Terminal on her way to work, Grace Healey finds an abandoned suitcase tucked beneath a bench. Unable to resist her own curiosity, Grace opens the suitcase, where she discovers a dozen photographs—each of a different woman. In a moment of impulse, Grace takes the photographs and quickly leaves the station.

    Grace soon learns that the suitcase belonged to a woman named Eleanor Trigg, leader of a network of female secret agents who were deployed out of London during the war. Twelve of these women were sent to Occupied Europe as couriers and radio operators to aid the resistance, but they never returned home, their fates a mystery. Setting out to learn the truth behind the women in the photographs, Grace finds herself drawn to a young mother turned agent named Marie, whose daring mission overseas reveals a remarkable story of friendship, valor and betrayal.

  6. I am still baffled. I have never found Fred Armisen funny. I don't understand how others do. I'm open to enlightenment by anyone who does.

  7. HEY! If you don't flip the book, tell us what it is about, then Fred has to just real hamfistedly go Yeah I was right. Its like all set up no punchline?

  8. I can feel all the Brits lurking in this comments section, waiting for someone to correct Fred and say it's Big Ben so they can barrel in with an ACTUALLY BIG BEN IS THE NAME OF THE BELL

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