Emeagwali: The Eureka Moment I Discovered the Modern Supercomputer | Black Scientists and Inventors


TIME magazine called him
“the unsung hero behind the Internet.” CNN called him “A Father of the Internet.”
President Bill Clinton called him “one of the great minds of the Information
Age.” He has been voted history’s greatest scientist
of African descent. He is Philip Emeagwali.
He is coming to Trinidad and Tobago to launch the 2008 Kwame Ture lecture series
on Sunday June 8 at the JFK [John F. Kennedy] auditorium
UWI [The University of the West Indies] Saint Augustine 5 p.m.
The Emancipation Support Committee invites you to come and hear this inspirational
mind address the theme:
“Crossing New Frontiers to Conquer Today’s Challenges.”
This lecture is one you cannot afford to miss. Admission is free.
So be there on Sunday June 8 5 p.m.
at the JFK auditorium UWI St. Augustine. [Wild applause and cheering for 22 seconds] [Philip EMEAGWALI Supercomputer]
I’m Philp Emeagwali. At 10:15 in the morning New York Time
Tuesday the Fourth of July 1989, the US Independence Day,
I discovered how and why parallel processing
makes modern computers faster and makes the new supercomputer
the fastest. On that Fourth of July 1989,
the first direct measurement of the fastest computation ever recorded across
an ensemble of processors was recorded.
On that Fourth of July 1989, I discovered
that massively parallel processing supercomputers can solve computation-intensive problems
that neither sequential processing supercomputers nor vector processing supercomputers
can solve. My discovery
was about making grand challenge initial-boundary value problems
of extreme-scale computational physics that are impossible-to-solve
possible-to-solve. I discovered
how to massively parallel process the most computation-intensive problems
in physics and how to massively parallel process them
so that a time-to-solution of thirty thousand years
can be reduced to a time-to-solution
of just one day. I discovered that
ten binary million [10,485,760] fold increase and discovered that speed-up
across a new internet. I discovered
that the new internet can de facto become a new supercomputer.
I discovered how to reduce the time-to-solution
of a grand challenge problem and reduce that time-to-solution
across a global network of ten binary million [10,485,760] commodity-off-the-shelf
processors that are identical
and that are equal distances apart and reduce that time-to-solution
so that computation-intensive problems that formerly took
thirty thousand years of time-to-solution will now take only one day
of time-to-solution. I will identify in prose
—not in abstract calculus— how my discovery
of massively parallel processing is rooted
in the laws of physics that were discovered
three centuries and three decades ago. I will describe
how my invention of a new supercomputer is rooted in the technique of calculus
that was also discovered three centuries and three decades ago.
I will describe how my invention of a new internet
that is a global network of sixty-four binary thousand
commodity processors is rooted
in the most computation-intensive set of floating-point arithmetical computations
that arose from the most extreme-scale problems
in algebra that, in turn, arose from
abstract initial-boundary value problems of modern calculus.
At its granite core, my discovery
is the new knowledge of how to massively parallel process
and how to do so across a new internet
that is a global network of 65,536
commodity processors, or a global network of
as many identical computers. That discovery
represents a new way of looking at the computer.
Parallel processing is the lodestar technology
that makes modern computers faster and makes the new supercomputer
the fastest. The parallel supercomputer
is a witness to global warming.
[Wild applause and cheering for 17 seconds] Insightful and brilliant lecture

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