Cracking Ancient Codes: Cuneiform Writing – with Irving Finkel

46 thoughts on “Cracking Ancient Codes: Cuneiform Writing – with Irving Finkel

  1. If you liked this talk then there's more Irving on the internet! Check out the British Museum's channel, we really liked this video on ancient demons – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOT75GB64Hw

  2. ❇️The first tablets means to teach how to glimb and seek eggs from a bird's nest, πŸ§—πŸ£ ,there's clearly a guy climbing in the middle of the tablet , even looks like a kid cut out a character in the other one to play withπŸ§€πŸ€—πŸ§ πŸ€Ί,πŸ§™πŸ„, I feel like memories are coding…πŸ­πŸ€–πŸ›©οΈ

  3. 1:45 honestly, what does in the British museum? πŸ™‚
    Seems to me all these methods mentions still exists in different languages/writing systems around the world, like Japanese, Chinese, etc.

  4. Excellent, as always! Eager to learn more, and easy to understand for non native english speakers such as myself (I'm french)!

  5. Reminds me of learning Kanji radicals, and the development of Kana. Also Kun and On pronunciations. Where do I go to learn Cuneiform?

  6. Irving Finkel is great but I think he would rather us be having intelligent conversations about this, not just praising him. I would like to hear him speak about why the sumerian script is the only one of its kind

  7. What!? Those people used those clay tablets for 2 thousand years. Did I hear it right? And none of them thought to improve it! And we're complaining now that our iPhones get outdated in 2 years.

  8. Another superb lecture by Irving Finkel. He is a master teacher of cuneiform writing systems and a delightful lecturer. I have watched several of his other lectures on-line and was equally impressed. Please continue posting his lectures. He is a treasure.

  9. I am quite certain that Irving Finkel is seething about the choice of words in the title of this video. I mean "Cracking ancient codes …" after everything he mentioned about this being irrelevant to "code cracking"? Really? Maybe, just maybe, the person who picks the title of each video should do that after watching the video?

  10. I've never heard anyone speak at the speed of thought before. I'd hate to have to take an exam on what info/facts this gent has put forth in this lecture. Most awesome. I bet he is on everyone's "invite" list. Enjoyed immensely. Thank you.

  11. I'm here for the eyebrow comments… and haven't found even one.

    But while I'm here I might as well mention hoe great this lecture was!

  12. I'm here for the eyebrow comments… and haven't found even one.

    But while I'm here I might as well mention hoe great this lecture was!

  13. I'm here for the eyebrow comments… and haven't found even one.

    But while I'm here I might as well mention hoe great this lecture was!

  14. I'm here for the eyebrow comments… and haven't found even one.

    But while I'm here I might as well mention hoe great this lecture was!

  15. This is why I usually save up RI lectures for special occassions!
    All is forgotten about the mundane liquids incident.

  16. Silim, A proper old school professor who really makes you as excited as he seems to be about the subject. Wonderful!

  17. It would be an understatement to say that I delighted in listening to this man with whom I felt an immediate kinship. Thank you ever so much for inviting him to speak at the Royal Institution.

  18. I thoroughly enjoyed this presentation of a subject I previously considered too boring. I only watched it because I enjoy the RI videos, especially the Christmas Lectures, which I have watched since the 1960s. Irving's humour along with attention to detail make Cuneiform seem exciting to study, which I expect it is to him. My own personal interest, apart from science, is in the evolution of languages across the Pacific Ocean, which has led me to believe that migrations from Egypt and the Far East combined during the progress across the Pacific Islands southwards.

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